Alan Doyle

Wednesday
13
May

Full Band Folk Rock

 

Why you should see this show…

Perhaps he is best known as the lead singer of Canadian folk rock band Great Big Sea, but he also just so happens to be a jack of many trades. Alan Doyle is not only a musician but also an author and actor. When he has spare time he tours and performs folk-pop music that will have the audience tapping their feet all night. No matter how you discovered Alan Doyle, this show featuring Alan backed by his full band will be one you can truly enjoy.
 

Alan Doyle Bio
Alan Doyle chalks up a lot of where is he right now—with both his third solo album and his second bookreleased in October 2017—to luck. “I’m the luckiest guy I’ve ever even heard of,” he says. “This was all I ever wanted, a life in the music business, singing concerts. I was lucky to be born in the family I was, in Petty Harbour. I was lucky that Sean, Bob and Darrell found me and asked me to join their band. I was lucky the Canadian music fans were into it.”

And yet, one listen to A Week at The Warehouse makes it plainly clear that there’s a lot more than luck at play in this decades long, awards-studded career. This album, recorded live off the floor with Doyle’s “beautiful band,” as he calls them, with producer Bob Rock at the helm, is chock-a-block with country-tinged, radio ready tunes that bring with them the flavur of some of Doyle’s favorite artists, from John Mellencamp to Rock’s own band, Payolas (In fact, Doyle covers a Payolas tune on this album, Forever Light Will Shine, with that band’s singer, Paul Hyde appearing as a guest vocalist.)

In addition to Rock’s work with Payolas, Doyle loved the metal albums Rockproduced in the eighties, and his more recent work with the Tragically Hip, Jann Arden, and others. “It’s a real treat to get to meet your heroes and they turn out to be nicer than you ever imagined,” Doyle says. “A couple things about Bob, he’s first of all, still a massive fan of a good song, for a man who’s seen hundreds and thousands of them, he’s still thrilled to get a chance to work on a good song with a good band in a good studio, that’s still a perfect day for him. And secondly he’s just a wonderful motivator to get great players to play at their best.”

That kind of ease and experience—plus the incredible talents of Doyle’s touring band—made recording A Week at The Warehouse a relative breeze. Of the band, Doyle says, “I am so by far the worst person. I wish I was being modest. They’re an incredible band to sing with every night. I look around the stage and I can’t believe my luck.”

Doyle’s desire was to have an album that sounded and felt like the live show, and A Week at The Warehouse does just that. Lead single “Summer, Summer Night” is a cowrite with long time collaborator Thomas “Tawgs” Salter. Doyle had it in mind to write a Celtic country song about summer nights in Petty Harbour when he was a young adult, playing guitar and singing with his friends around a bonfire on the beach—and teaching his friend Jimmy to play “one song, he figured he could get that one girl to go out with him. I showed him how to play Dirty Old Town and if memory serves correctly it was very successful. It’s a fun song about letting yourself go the way you could when you were that age.”

Then there’s the ukulele and whistling ditty “Beautiful to Me,” also co-written with Tawgs Salter. This one, Doyle says, is a response to an attempt in North Carolina to limit the access trans people have to bathrooms in schools. “I was drawn to write a song that told people on the outside that they were certainly welcome in my place,” Doyle says. “If you’ve got love in your heart, that’s all that matters to me. It’s such a simple little song. It’s gentle. I just want everyone to know that if you feel like you’re on the outside, you’re not on the outside in this group—my arms and doors are open wide.”

In effort to balance the sound of album with something more rooted in Doyle’s own history, he dug out an older tune, one he’d written for the Robin Hood film in 2010. Doyle remembered the film had used the chorus and parts of two different verses of “Bully Boys,” but he couldn’t remember which. So he took to YouTube, hoping to find the scene. “I found dozens if not hundreds of versions of that song, from Spain, Croatia, China, the UK,” he says, astonished. “People have written their own verses in the old traditional way, it has made its way around the world as a sea shanty. It’s the old way of spreading a folk song, but using the Internet.” Doyle knew he had to finally record the song himself.

And there’s more of Doyle’s history in “Somewhere in a Song,” a tribute to his parents, who “made us feel like we could handle anything life gave to us,” Doyle says, adding he didn’t realize till he was an adult that his family had been poor. The song’s opening line is one Doyle heard his father say, when someone asked how the elder Doyles had gotten together. “My father said, ‘that’s simple I suppose, she could play and I could sing.’ It’s a simple homage, a celebration of my mom and dad’s attitude that you spend exactly none of your time worrying about the stuff you don’t have and exactly all your time making the most of what you do have.” It’s an ethos Doyle has adopted whole-heartedly.“

I still think of myself as a person that has one job, a guy who plays in a band for a living, that’s me. If someone asks me to write songs, I guess I’m a songwriter too. If someone asks me to produce a record for them, then I guess I’m a record producer too. I never looked for an acting job in my life—they come to me. Someone calls who needs a hairy, Irish-looking fellow to bully someone or play the lute, come throw rocks at Colin Farrell, okay, sounds fun. It’s a laugh. Books came to me the same way, Random House said, we’ve been reading your blog, why not write a book, so I thought okay!” There’s more to it than all of that, for certain, but Doyle parries it off, in his usual way. “I’m grateful to do all of it. It’s a wonderful life and I’m very lucky to have it.”

 

 

Chris Trapper Bio
“A brilliantly gifted songwriter.” –The Huffington Post

Chris Trapper is a storyteller. With his soulful, honeyed tenor, sly humor and an uncanny knack for melody, Chris has traveled the world over, performing to a dedicated and ever growing fan base with nothing but his guitar and his songs. Raised on Prine and Kristofferson, Trapper’s first foray in the music industry was as frontman of the critically acclaimed alt-rock band The Push Stars (Capitol Records). Over the past decade, Chris has become a modern day acoustic troubadour, performing over 150 dates a year as a headliner and sharing the stage with the likes of Colin Hay, Martin Sexton and even John Prine himself.

The new CD Symphonies of Dirt and Dust is a collection of 12 songs written and performed by Chris Trapper and Produced by Jason Meeker at Silver Top Studios, Boston, MA. Guest musicians include Dan McLoughlin of The Push Stars on bass and NYC singer-songwriter Amy Fairchild on harmonies.

“I have to mention Jason, the producer of Symphonies of Dirt & Dust. He is my old friend, who not only worked the clubs in rock bands but also worked for Geffen records in their heyday, so he has a good sense of the music business as a whole. What I love about Jason is that he is absolutely obsessed with his craft and getting songs right.”

Every record tells a story. For me, much more than gimmicks, my albums are like diary entries, or truthful accounts of where I’m at in life. I suppose that might be the same for most songwriters, but in the spectrum of the music business, it’s still an animal that’s nearly extinct.” Chris Trapper

A prolific songwriter, Chris has garnered several high profile film placements including There’s Something About Mary (Ben Stiller, Cameron Diaz), The Devil Wears Prada (Meryl Streep), Say It Isn’t So (Heather Graham) Gun Shy (Sandra Bullock, Liam Neeson) and most recently, Some Kind of Beautiful (Pierce Brosnan, Salma Hayek) as well as significant television placements including All My Children, Women’s Murder Club, Malcolm In The Middle, a coveted placement in George Clooney’s final episode of ER, the theme song for WB Networks dramedy Pepper Dennis and a cameo on-screen appearance with the show’s star, Rebecca Romijn.

Chris has written 7 songs with/for Canadian band Great Big Sea, including their #1 single “Sea Of No Cares” from the certified-platinum Sea Of No Cares CD. Great Big Sea covered Trapper’s song “Everything Shines” and their version served as the debut single off their certified-gold Road Rage CD album. Chris’ songwriting collaborations with Great Big Sea earned him two prestigious SOCAN awards. Rob Thomas of Matchbox Twenty and Antigone Rising have performed other notable versions of Trapper’s songs.

“His humble sense of humility is what makes Trapper’s songs so strong… He makes you feel like you are the person he’s singing about.” Popdose

 

Dining Options

You have two dining options when attending a show in our Concert Hall:

Rusty Anchor at the Music Box – If you’d enjoy a more extensive menu, we suggest you dine downstairs in the Rusty Anchor before your concert. The Rusty Anchor menu features a great mix of Cleveland Comfort food including a selection of seafood, steaks & chops. Reservations are required for parties of two or more. To make a dinner reservation, please click here or call our Box Office at (216) 242-1250 and allow 90 minutes to dine prior to the beginning of the show upstairs.

Concert Hall – Our Concert Hall menu is fast to the table and allows you to dine right in your ticketed seat. So, there is no additional reservation required. The Concert Hall kitchen will be open through intermission. Table side beverage service will continue throughout the concert.